Top 10 Best Music Players for Linux in 2022 – It’s FOSS | Hot Mobile Press

While many of us turn to music streaming services, some users prefer to use the good old music player on their Linux system.

Of course, you get a music player program pre-installed with every Linux distribution.

However, depending on your needs, you may want to try a variety of music players that offer you more features or better user experience.

You can save time by organizing your collections, sorting best playlist and other things.

So, to keep you out of trouble, I present the best music player apps for Ubuntu and other Linux distributions.

1. Amberol

Are you looking for something to simply play music without any fancy features?

Amberol is your best choice. It offers a super intuitive user experience and offers essential music controls for mixing, creating a playlist, navigating through the song and more.

We also have a dedicated article on amberol if you want to learn more about it.

2. Elisha

elisa music player

Elisa is an awesome music player developed by KDE. It is primarily tailored for KDE-based distributions, but should work on other Linux distributions as well. I tried it with Ubuntu 22.04 LTS GNOME.

Elisa could be the perfect candidate for you if you’re looking for a fast, good-looking, and feature-rich music player. It gives you some control over the layout and allows you to access all available options or switch to an immersive mode to focus on playing music.

It is available for Linux, BSD derivatives and Windows. For Linux, you can find it in the official repositories of the main distributions and install it from the terminal.

You can also find it listed in the software center of the respective distribution.

3. Rhythm box

rhythm box

Rythmbox is a popular music player considering it comes preinstalled with many Linux distributions, including Ubuntu.

It’s a simple, feature-rich player that lets you access Internet radio, manage a music library, and stream music services like Last.fm and Magnatune.

In addition, you can extend its functions with plugins.

The best way to install it is using Flathub’s Flatpak package, which you can also find in the software center.

4. Sayonara player

Sayonara player 2022

Sayonara Player is an underrated option if you’re looking for a customizable and lightweight music player that focuses on performance.

Although the interface is simple, it supports multiple libraries, album view, directory view, genre organization, dynamic playback, equalizer, lyrics, internet stream, podcast and more.

You can install it using the official PPA, AppImage file, Snap package or explore other options on the download page.

5. Strawberry Music Player

Strawberry Music Player

Strawberry Music Player is a fork of Clementine (which was a popular music player but hasn’t seen any new releases since 2016).

It supports various music file formats and allows you to organize/manage playlists easily. You can also edit tags in audio files and get album art support.

In addition, it offers an audio analyzer and an equalizer.

It is available for Linux, Windows and macOS. For Linux, you can use the official PPA or download the deb package from the GitHub releases section.

6. DeadBeef players

dead meat 2022

DeaDBeef Player is one of the oldest options that is still actively maintained for multiple platforms including Linux, Windows, and macOS.

You can edit music tags, read all details, play all types of files and install additional plugins to improve your experience. You can also split albums into tracks and manage multiple playlists.

Interestingly, you can also use it to transcode files into other formats.

For Ubuntu, you can download and install the deb package from its official website. If you have Arch Linux or another distribution, explore the packages available on their website.

7. cmus (terminal music player)

cmus 2022

Don’t worry if you’d rather not leave the terminal for anything else, cmus is an option.

You get all essential functions right from the command line. You need to find and set up the right directory to use the music player.

It may not be easy for new users. So you must explore the built-in tutorial and read our dedicated cmus music player article to learn how to add a playlist, manage tracks and more. It’s available in the official repositories, so you can find it in the Software Center or install it on Ubuntu via Terminal.

8. VLC media player

vlc linux

VLC Media Player is one of the most popular options for any platform including Linux.

You know what it does if you’re already a fan of it. It supports many file formats and has excellent features like transcoding. Unlike other options, it’s not just a music player, but also supports videos, DVDs, and some streaming protocols. It’s primarily a video player, but it can also handle music files fairly well.

VLC offers packages for almost every major Linux distribution, including Debian, Ubuntu, openSUSE, Arch, and Fedora. You can find the packages on the official download page.

Alternatively, you can simply install the VLC media player from the terminal.

9. Museums

Museums

Museeks is a cross-platform music player with a clean interface. It supports major file formats and helps you manage playlists, queues, loops, album art and more.

It supports a dark mode theme along with playback speed controls.

In addition, it supports .m3u import/export. You can find packages for Linux (deb/rpm/AppImage) in the GitHub releases section.

10. Bold

brave player

Audacious is another music player that has been around for over a decade and is available for Linux and Windows.

It uses Qt to offer a responsive user interface without consuming much of your system resources. Interestingly, you can also equip some Winamp Classic skins. In any case, the user experience is pretty basic.

Audacious supports some plugins for lyrics, VU meters and more. You can install it directly from the official repositories via terminal or search for it in the software center.

Wrap up

Music players are here to stay even as we move to streaming applications.

Unfortunately, some native Linux applications like Mellow Player, Nuvola, and Nuclear that provided access to streaming services are no longer actively maintained. So, if you are thinking of accessing Spotify/SoundCloud on Linux, you should look for any of their available official/unofficial clients.

Music players are perfect for users who want to play around with their local collection, organize playlists and customize their native desktop experience while protecting their privacy!

Did we miss one of your favorite music players? Let us know in the comments!


Leave a Comment