Battle between Apple and Meta-Headset will define the future of the internet – Zuckerberg – 9to5Mac | Hot Mobile Press

The future of the internet will depend on the outcome of a battle between Apple and meta-headsets, claims Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg.

He told staff that the two companies had very different visions for the Metaverse, admitting it’s not yet clear which will be better…

background

The metaverse is a term first coined by Neal Stephenson in the 1992 science fiction novel snow crash. Although there is no fixed definition of the term, it encompasses the idea that the internet exists as an immersive virtual world that can be accessed through a combination of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR).

Facebook has been the loudest proponent of the idea that the Metaverse represents the future of the internet, while Apple did seen more reserved.

Apple’s industrial designers weren’t convinced that consumers would be willing to wear headsets for long periods of time.

We recently summarized what we think we know so far about Apple’s headset plans, while a recent report suggests Meta is working on a fairly similar headset called the Quest Pro.

The edge received a recording of Zuckerberg making the remarks in an all-hands meeting earlier this month.

Mark Zuckerberg believes that Apple and his company are in a “very deep, philosophical competition” to build the metaverse, and hints that the two tech giants are poised to clash over sales of augmented and virtual reality hardware.

Meta’s CEO told employees earlier this month that they are competing with Apple to determine “which direction the internet should go.”

He continued:

“This is a competition of philosophies and ideas where they believe they create a better consumer experience by doing everything themselves and integrating it tightly. And we believe there’s a lot to do with specialization across different companies, and [that] will allow a much larger ecosystem to exist.”

Surprisingly, Meta’s CEO said he believed an open approach would create a larger Metaverse ecosystem, but acknowledged that “it’s not really clear in advance whether an open or closed ecosystem will be better.” He said that Windows has won the PC battle while Apple has been the more successful player in the mobile space.

Zuckerberg also contrasted the two companies’ approaches to billing their hardware.

We always deliver our devices at cost price or with a small subsidy, in some cases slightly above cost price. But the bottom line is that our business isn’t primarily a premium for the devices.

Below you can read Zuckerberg’s full remarks on the upcoming battle between Apple and Meta headsets:

I think it’s pretty clear that Apple is going to be a competitor for us, not just as a product but philosophically. We’re approaching this openly and trying to build a more open ecosystem. We’re trying to make more things interoperable with Android. We are trying to develop the metaverse in such a way that you can bring your virtual goods from one world to another. We started the Metaverse Open Standards Group with a few other people you just mentioned, and Apple didn’t join. But I don’t think that’s a surprise. Apple has been the closed supplier of computers for several computer generations.

This is a competition of philosophies and ideas where they believe they create a better consumer experience by doing everything themselves and integrating it tightly. And we believe there’s a lot to do with specialization across different companies, and [that] will allow the existence of a much larger ecosystem.

Among other things, I find it interesting that it is not really clear in advance whether an open or closed ecosystem is better. If you look back at PCs, Windows was clearly the one that was much bigger and became the standard and norm that people used. And Mac did well, but I think PC and Windows were the most important ecosystem in that environment in my opinion.

On mobile, I’d say it’s more the other way around. There are more Android devices than iOS devices, but I think more high-end in developed countries and places like the US or Western Europe. [and] A lot of the culture makers and developers, I think that’s leaning quite a bit more towards the iPhone and iOS. So I’d say that Apple has really carved out a pretty good position for themselves in mobile, and that’s why they’re the most valuable company in the world, or maybe one of the most valuable companies in the world.

But I just don’t think the future is already written here for the metaverse. And I think part of our job is to continue doing leading-edge research and driving that forward at all levels of the stack. We do VR. We do AR. We always deliver our devices at cost price or with a small subsidy, in some cases slightly above cost price. But the bottom line is that our business isn’t primarily a premium for the devices. We want as many people as possible to interact there. This includes being an open ecosystem that is interoperable.

Our North Star is, by the end of the decade, can we get a billion people into the metaverse doing hundreds of dollars apiece in digital commerce? If we do that, within that decade we will build a business as big as our current ad business. I think that’s a really exciting thing. I think a big part of how you’re doing that is pushing the open metaverse, which is what we’re going to do.

So yes, Apple will be a competitor. I think that’s pretty clear, but it’s actually a very strong competitor. It is not just [that] They have a device that has more features than we do. It’s a very deep, philosophical contest about which direction the internet should go. And I’m proud of the investments we’re making to help drive the open metaverse forward and hopefully make the next version of computing a little more open.

Photo: Julien Tromeur/Unsplash

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